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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Thekstategeek is new and improved. TECHTOIT.COM

January 29, 2011 Leave a comment

WE HAVE MOVED. Due to our unexpected success, we have changed domains and moved to a “big boy” server. If you reach this page via a search, or reference or anything really, then click the link below to take you to our new site – TECHTOIT.COM. New logo, new slogan, new look, new feel… it’s the real deal.

WOW THAT SOUNDS AWESOME! TAKE ME TO TECHTOIT.COM RIGHT NOW!

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One thing the Xbox should have, that it doesn’t

January 16, 2011 1 comment

The Xbox 360 is versatile. Wanna indulge in the guilty pleasures known as video games? Xbox has it. Wanna watch highlights from last night’s big game that you missed? Xbox has it. Wanna listen to your favorite band and related artists on internet radio? Xbox has it. Wanna video chat with your friend across the country? Xbox can do that. Wanna update your Facebook status or tweet something on Twitter? Xbox can do that. Wanna surf the internet? PS3 and Wii can do that. Wait a second, Microsoft’s game console can’t surf the internet?

Herein lies the issue. Microsoft was established on April 4 in 1975 as a computing company. Their operating system, Windows, has sold billions of copies over the years, amassing an incomprehensible amount of revenue. Their success has created four billionaires and 12,000 millionaires from within their employee pool. Within the last decade they have diversified, creating the Xbox and its successor the Xbox 360 as well as portable media player brand Zune and a mobile phone OS Windows Mobile/Windows Phone 7. Both the Zune and their mobile OS have internet browsing capabilities, but the Xbox does not. The biggest computer company on the planet has withheld the ability to surf the internet on their gaming console. Ironic.

Its not an issue of can or can not, for both of the Xbox’s competitors as well as hackers have been able to load internet browsers onto their game consoles. The Nintendo Wii’s computing power is weak in comparison to that of the Xbox 360, yet the console allows for fairly smooth navigation online. The PS3, however, is more powerful so it does not come as a surprise that it also has an internet browser. In addition to flexing its computing muscle, the Xbox has internet-enabled applications that are built into the OS. Netflix, ESPN, Twitter, Facebook and Last.fm are all accessible when you’re connected to the internet. Oh, and one more thing. Xbox LIVE. The online multiplayer gaming and digital media delivery service that requires the internet? The service that millions use on a daily basis to interact with each other. That too, is an internet-driven Microsoft force.

So why, Microsoft? Why, Xbox 360 team? We want an internet browser. We know you can, and that you should. I mean, come on, everyone else is doing it.

One thing the Xbox should have, that it doesn't

January 16, 2011 1 comment

The Xbox 360 is versatile. Wanna indulge in the guilty pleasures known as video games? Xbox has it. Wanna watch highlights from last night’s big game that you missed? Xbox has it. Wanna listen to your favorite band and related artists on internet radio? Xbox has it. Wanna video chat with your friend across the country? Xbox can do that. Wanna update your Facebook status or tweet something on Twitter? Xbox can do that. Wanna surf the internet? PS3 and Wii can do that. Wait a second, Microsoft’s game console can’t surf the internet?

Herein lies the issue. Microsoft was established on April 4 in 1975 as a computing company. Their operating system, Windows, has sold billions of copies over the years, amassing an incomprehensible amount of revenue. Their success has created four billionaires and 12,000 millionaires from within their employee pool. Within the last decade they have diversified, creating the Xbox and its successor the Xbox 360 as well as portable media player brand Zune and a mobile phone OS Windows Mobile/Windows Phone 7. Both the Zune and their mobile OS have internet browsing capabilities, but the Xbox does not. The biggest computer company on the planet has withheld the ability to surf the internet on their gaming console. Ironic.

Its not an issue of can or can not, for both of the Xbox’s competitors as well as hackers have been able to load internet browsers onto their game consoles. The Nintendo Wii’s computing power is weak in comparison to that of the Xbox 360, yet the console allows for fairly smooth navigation online. The PS3, however, is more powerful so it does not come as a surprise that it also has an internet browser. In addition to flexing its computing muscle, the Xbox has internet-enabled applications that are built into the OS. Netflix, ESPN, Twitter, Facebook and Last.fm are all accessible when you’re connected to the internet. Oh, and one more thing. Xbox LIVE. The online multiplayer gaming and digital media delivery service that requires the internet? The service that millions use on a daily basis to interact with each other. That too, is an internet-driven Microsoft force.

So why, Microsoft? Why, Xbox 360 team? We want an internet browser. We know you can, and that you should. I mean, come on, everyone else is doing it.

Dashing through the snow… with NORAD and Google

December 23, 2010 Leave a comment

By: Chris Nguyen

(Cross-posted from the Google Mobile Blog)

Every Christmas Eve, children all over the world ask themselves—and their parents—questions about Santa’s magical journey. How does Santa visit so many children in one night? Will he eat the cookies I left out? How does he fit all those presents into his sleigh? These childhood mysteries are part of what makes the Santa tradition so special.

There’s one timeless question that we’re proud to say we can help answer: Where in the world is Santa at this very moment? Thanks in part to recent advances in warp-speed GPS technology and some very clever elves (elveneering?) NORAD Tracks Santa is once again prepped and ready to go.

Starting tomorrow, December 24 at 2:00am EST, visit www.noradsanta.org to follow Santa as he journeys around the world delivering presents to children in more than 200 countries and territories. There are a few different ways to find the jolly old man in his unmistakable red suit over the course of the day, so feel free to track him using any of the following methods:

  • See Santa on a Google Map: On your home computer or laptop, visit www.noradsanta.org and choose your preferred language. You’ll see a large Google Map on the page displaying Santa’s current location and his next stop. Click the video icons to watch “Santa Cam” videos, and click the gift icons to learn more about each city.
  • Watch Santa fly with the Google Earth Plug-in: From www.noradsanta.org, click on the link Track Santa in Google Earth. You’ll see Santa steering his sleigh right on the webpage. If you don’t have the Google Earth plug-in, you can get ready by downloading it ahead of time.
  • Follow Santa on your phone: Track Santa from your mobile phone by opening Google Maps for mobile and searching for [santa]. Or, visit m.noradsanta.org on your phone’s browser.
  • Subscribe to his YouTube channel: Santa’s home on YouTube is at http://www.youtube.com/noradtrackssanta. That’s where you can find videos from his journey throughout the night.
  • Get real-time information about Santa’s location: Use Google’s Realtime Search to get updates from social networks, news and micro-blogs like Twitter at @noradsanta, and keep up with news about his journey on this Facebook page.

For any techie questions you might have, we’ve also put together some helpful tips and tricks about all the cool ways you can experience Santa’s journey. Now that you know how to follow Saint Nick on Christmas Eve, it’s our tradition to tell the story of how this all started…

NORAD (North American Aerospace Defence Command) first began to track Santa in 1955 when a misprinted advertisement in a Sears & Roebuck catalogue mistakenly led callers expecting a Santa-hotline to the NORAD commander-in-chief’s telephone. Embracing the spirit of the season, NORAD used its satellite and radar capabilities to offer callers sleigh-location updates, and has tracked Santa’s whereabouts on Christmas Eve ever since. Then in 2004, Google started tracking Santa on Google Earth as a 20% project, which in 2007 grew into a partnership with NORAD, adding the mapping technology of Google Maps and Google Earth to the NORAD experience. Over the years, other Google teams have also joined in the holiday fun (YouTube, Google Voice’s www.SendACallFromSanta.com and Google SketchUp).

Categories: News Tags: , , , ,

My Plea for the Universal Device

December 10, 2010 Leave a comment

In my experience, the typical techie likes the newest, shiniest, coolest gadgets that come out. In my case, I like to purchase them. It makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside to read up on the newest iDevice or Android handheld that is coming out, because I can envision myself dropping some-odd hundred dollars and tearing into the box the beautiful hardware would inevitably come packaged in. Lately I have broadened my horizons to objects that can’t necessarily fit in my hand, ala Google TV. But henceforth is where I was stopped cold. I was hit with a revelation; my eyes had been opened; I can see clearly now the rain has gone: I will be wasting my money.

Since the middle school days where I would draw my dream device and type furiously away into Microsoft Word, spilling the features from my brain to paper, I have craved a “universal device.” (I code-named mine the Lotus, but that has absolutely nothing to do with this article.) Take an iPod Touch, a Kindle, a laptop, the EVO, a Garmin GPS, a Nintendo DS, an Xbox 360 plus Kinect and any other innovative, crazy-awesome technologies that will come out within the next few years and splice them together. I had envisioned a 4-inch, technological Frankenstein that I would carry around in my pocket and forever cherish until death do us part. I had not taken into account how many steps, how many attempts and how many years it would take to create the likes of which I had fathomed… or the amount of money I would throw at electronics to help them get there.

And that is where I have arrived today. It seems as if every device is trying to become like the others. TV now plays YouTube videos and allows you to check your Twitter between episodes of Full House, an eReader now allows you to access and download apps that facilitate the same activities, and my phone has been able to do that for the last year. Laptops want to be like tablets and cell phones want to be like laptops. Everything includes GPS capabilities and touch screens are the new QWERTY keyboard. My iPod can remotely control my TV and my Blue-Ray player requires software updates. Nearly everything that comes out these days has the ability of the next, but not quite, and that is wherein my dilemma lies.

I like where things are headed. In a few short years, my Lotus will be real, but until then I am finding myself questioning each purchase. Because of the new features that each device is trying to incorporate to compete with the others, the prices are rising, and the markets are blurring. Take the iPod Touch for example. What exactly is it? It’s not just an MP3 player. 5 years ago an MP3 player cost roughly $60 and played MP3s. The iPod Touch is in a category of its own. Wikipedia calls it “a portable media player, personal digital assistant and Wi-Fi mobile platform.” WTF? 5 years ago, hardly any average person would even know what that would entail, but now 10 year-olds receive them in their stockings during Christmas time. I would be perfectly ok with this if the Kindle did not roll out with an App Store of its own, and my TV didn’t develop the same internet functionality.

The other day I was talking to my roommate about getting a Kindle and a Google TV with some money I had saved up. He looked at me very quizzically and asked “Well, why? Can’t your iPhone read eBooks and let you do the same things as Google TV?” And to that, I really had no answer. And that really put a damper on my geeky, gadget collecting mood. So I suppose the bottom line is this: could someone please develop the universal device ASAP? I, as well as my wallet, would greatly appreciate it.